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Jambo cleanup done in flood victim’s memory

Page Gellner was a big fan of the Monday after Jamboree in the Hills, when she would join a few dozen workers who get together to clean up the aftermath of the country music fest.

Tens of thousands of country music fans made their way to Morristown last week to take in Jamboree in the Hills.

And cleanup crews from all over the country followed them to help make the campgrounds shine.

But one local crew wasn't just there for the garbage, they're trying to raise money for a local girl who drowned in flood waters a year ago today.

“We are basically coming out just to clean up. We've been here since Wednesday night cleaning for her,” volunteer Heather McCamick said.

Page Gellner was a big fan of the Monday after Jamboree in the Hills, when she would join a few dozen workers who get together to clean up the aftermath of the country music fest.

“Page would be the first one here,” McCamick said. “She was the last one that left. She was not afraid to get her hands dirty, her butt dirty. Whatever she needed to do to get the job done, she was getting the job done.”

Last July, Page was in a van with her boyfriend Michael Grow when flood waters swept them into Big Wheeling Creek. Gellner's body was found in the Ohio River a week later.

Now, a year to the day, her family and clean-up crew friends are back out on the job. And this time, they're doing it for the girl who made a ton of friends at this same point for years.

“She didn't know a stranger. And everybody knew her,” McCamick said. “We really realized that last year at this time. We saw how many people wanted to do things for Page, and we didn't even know them. And we were like, ‘how do you know her? Oh, we met her this one time and she was so awesome.’ She's different things to different people and so many things to everybody."

The money this crew raises will now go to the Prayers for Page fund.

They will hold a memorial tribute for her this Sunday at WesBanco Arena, where they'll release butterflies in a celebration of life.

As for now, they're remembering Page by doing what she always enjoyed, cleaning up after the party in Morristown.

“We wanted to do this for her, just to show her and show everybody and keep her out there in the community because if she would have been here this year, she would have been doing this with us and even more people would have gotten to know her and love her,” McCamick said.

As for the actual cleanup, workers said Jambo fans were actually much cleaner than they've been in past years.

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