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CCHS science students get college-level experience at their fingertips

New to Steubenville Catholic Central High School, the Anatomage Table Alpha looks a lot like an oversized smart phone. It is billed as “the most technologically advanced anatomy visualization system on the market."

It's out with the text book, and in with touch screen technology at Steubenville Catholic Central High School.

It’s called Anatomage Table Alpha, and it looks a lot like an oversized smart phone. It is billed as “the most technologically advanced anatomy visualization system on the market.”

The technology comes from a company in California and administrators at CCHS saw the benefits it could bring, and brought it to the back of Dr. Cindy Carney's classroom.

“I think every student that's come in the door over the last 2 days has been excited, and they wall want to see it; they all want to use it,” Carney said. “So the younger students that are still in the introductory courses, this is really going to motivate them to want to be in Bio 2 and anatomy.”

Whether it's the human body or animal anatomy, with the point of a finger, the Anatomage Table Alpha pulls up high resolution 3D images and displays.

“I'm a really visual learner, so this helps me a lot more than a text book, because I can understand it in a textbook, but then see it in real life,” student Theresa Duff said.

She says real life because some of the images come from actual cadaver cases. The technology is great for individual learning, or even group learning. The device can be connected to a smart board so the teacher can hold group lessons or even quizzes.

“Identify the organs, muscles, and peel back layer by layer, so we can start from the brain and spinal cord all the way to the skin,” student Jamie Ross said.

“I hope to be a physician's assistant, and to be that you need to know everything about the human body and anatomy,” student Evan Moore said.

The devise does come with a price tag of about $38,000, and the students responded with a resounding ‘yes’ when asked whether or not it's worth it.

The students will still participate in hands-on dissections throughout the school year.

The device is used in Biology 2 and Anatomy-Physiology classes.

Depending on how things go, teachers may expand its use to other courses.

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