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Wellsville officials hoping levy passes, say it will pull village out of financial crisis

Wellsville residents pitching in a little more of their paychecks may be the difference between the village having fire and emergency services running or not.

Wellsville is going through a financial crisis.

Mayor Nancy Murray is asking residents to vote yes on an emergency income tax levy that would put the village back in the black.

Residents pitching in a little more of their paychecks may be the difference between the village having fire and emergency services running or not.

"I’m hoping that the community will come together and help us with this emergency that we're in,” Murray said. “A half a percent would bring us out of this fiscal emergency.”

Murray says the income tax hasn't changed since the 1970s, and this emergency increase is a modest one.

"On a $30,000 wage, the cost would be to the taxpayer, $12.50 per month.

The increase would tackle a $300,000 deficit that got the attention of State Auditor’s Office last year. They were back Thursday afternoon to brief with the finance committee.

A new mayor, and a new fiscal officer seated in 2016, both say an income levy is the best way to put Wellsville on a path to prosperity.

"Certainly because this will bring us continuous growth in our revenue in general," Wellsville Fiscal Officer Wah Black said.

And there is a rebate of sorts for those live in the village.

"If you live in the village but work outside the village and pay another municipality for regional income tax, we offer a 50 percent credit," Black said.

And if a majority vote no to the levy.

"I'm not sure if we would be able to support the police and fire,” Murray said. “It could cut services to the village. "

On the political front, the mayor is promising better financial stewardship of the village to keep it solvent.

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