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Ohio Valley school officials react to strike’s conclusion

House Bill 41-45 passed unanimously through the West Virginia House and the Senate on Tuesday and was signed by Gov. Jim Justice, signaling an end to the 9-day work stoppage. (WCHS).

House Bill 4145 passed unanimously through the West Virginia House and the Senate on Tuesday and was signed by Gov. Jim Justice, signaling an end to the 9-day work stoppage.

The governor indicated that all employees will get 5 percent raises, including state workers.

County by county, schools are announcing they will re-open Wednesday, including Hancock, Ohio, Brooke, Marshall, Tyler and Wetzel counties.

Ohio County Schools Superintendent Kim Miller was breathing a sigh of relief on Tuesday afternoon.

“I couldn't be happier,” she said. “I couldn't be more proud as a superintendent. Our teachers and employees stuck together during a difficult time. I can’t thank our parents enough. I know it was very inconvenient, but I appreciate their support as we move forward. "

As far as PEIA, a task force is working on finding a permanent funding fix.

Miller is hopeful.

"Is everything fixed? No, but at least now we have a commitment that we will come up with a solution that will impact many people," Miller said.

Meanwhile, Marshall County schools are also returning to the classroom on Wednesday on a 1-hour delay schedule.

Superintendent Jeffrey Crook released this statement:

"We will be gathering information during the next several days so we can release an updated school calendar. On behalf of Marshall County Schools and the board of education, thank you for your patience and support during the past 9 days."

In Brooke County, Superintendent Ton Shute said there was elation.

"No one even communicated to me 'can we have a delay? Can we get ready?' No. They just want to go back. They want to see their students. Children want to be there," she said.

Hancock County Schools Superintendent Tim Woodward talked about the power of the strike.

"I think they should go back into those school buildings feeling a sense of accomplishment, and this state has seen a powerful force and that they are no longer going to settle," he said.

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