Most Shared

LIVE PARADE COVERAGE: UPDATED LINK

LIVE PARADE COVERAGE: UPDATED LINK

Columbiana County

Columbiana County

 
text size

Emotions mixed on potential widened availability of naloxone

Updated: Friday, March 7 2014, 06:33 PM EST

WTOV9.com
 
COLUMBIANA COUNTY, Ohio – A new bill passed by lawmakers in Ohio will allow those closest to heroin users to use a medication that can reverse its effects in the event of an overdose.
House Bill 170 was passed by the Ohio Senate on Feb. 21. With it already having been passed by the House in October, Gov. John Kasich can now sign it into law.
Previously only advanced paramedics were allowed to carry Naloxone. Doctors could only prescribe it to people who were addicted to opiates. With the passage of this bill, it could put the antidote into the hands of some of the people in the best position to use it.
“Just recently a woman came in with her son who was found unresponsive. She knew he was a heroin addict,” said Dr. Ross Lentini of East Liverpool City Hospital. “He lived, but I think there was a real close chance that he may have died if he wasn't discovered sooner.”
The bill would permit doctors to prescribe to family members and friends, and for first responders to carry it.
“Typically they really couldn’t do much, other than assist ventilations and if it was a cardiac arrest then they could begin CPR,” said Bob Swickard, director of operations at Lifeteam EMS in East Liverpool. “They didn’t have anything at their disposal that could prevent the cardiac arrest, which now they do.”
Administering the drug is simple. It can be given by a quick interjection or in the form of nasal spray.
However Swickard did express caution.
“We don’t want to perpetuate, OK this one does it because now they have the fix right there, so I’m a little leery on that side of it,” he said. “First responders, it’s absolutely great thing. I have some concerns with the availability outside that realm.”
Still, Lentini said the quicker the antidote is administered, the better for the patient.
“I mean we only have a matter of minutes before we have brain death,” Lentini said. “The heart is still beating; it doesn’t affect the heart. It just affects the nervous system that controls respirations. Respirations are turned off with this medication, the heart continues to beat and if we can get the respiratory system beating again, we can save a life.”

Emotions mixed on potential widened availability of naloxone


Advertise with us!

Related Stories

 
Advertise with us!